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Photographic Film

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090333D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Tracy, JF: AUTHOR

Abstract

A high-density, wide-exposure latitude photographic film is made with photographic chemicals substantially uniformly distributed throughout a poremetric or semipermeable optically clear organic substrate. This film can be made in several ways.

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Photographic Film

A high-density, wide-exposure latitude photographic film is made with photographic chemicals substantially uniformly distributed throughout a poremetric or semipermeable optically clear organic substrate. This film can be made in several ways.

A semicrystalline substrate, such as cellulose acetate, is stretched at a temperature up to and approaching its second order transition temperature and to an ultimate elongation somewhat below its elastic limit to open the crystal lattice structure. The substrate is immersed in a solution of diazo dye-forming photographic material while stretched to help the material elute through the substrate. Then the stretching forces are relaxed to entrap the diazo dye in the lattice structure and form a firm bond. The rate of elution, degree of Penetration, and consequent film density can be controlled according to the pore size of the substrate, the viscosity, surface tension and pressure, other characteristics of the solvent selected, and thermodynamic balance. The density of the image, provided when dye-forming chemicals such as diazonium compounds are thus imbibed into the substrate, closely approximates Beers' Law.

The photographic material is dispersed in precursor film formers and invest it, preferably by a solvent, in the film at the time of manufacture.

An electrophoresis technique is used, so that DC carries or drives the selected dye solution through the substrate. Time, temperature, viscosity, molecular c...