Browse Prior Art Database

Making Dispersion Hardened Metals and Alloys

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090372D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Petrovich, AI: AUTHOR

Abstract

This method for making dispersion hardening alloys combines a metal to be oxidized, dissolved in the molten matrix metal, with oxygen, dissolved in molten matrix metal in a separate container, which yields a dispersion of stable oxide in the matrix metal when both portions are mixed. A typical example of the process is shown using copper, although other metals such as nickel, iron, steel alloys, monels, etc., can be used. Two melts are prepared in separate crucibles 1 and 1a. One melt contains the matrix metal to which aluminum or some similar metal is added that has an affinity for oxygen. The other melt contains a stoichiometric quantity of an oxide such as copper oxide in the matrix metal. The molten metals are combined in holding vessel 2.

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Making Dispersion Hardened Metals and Alloys

This method for making dispersion hardening alloys combines a metal to be oxidized, dissolved in the molten matrix metal, with oxygen, dissolved in molten matrix metal in a separate container, which yields a dispersion of stable oxide in the matrix metal when both portions are mixed. A typical example of the process is shown using copper, although other metals such as nickel, iron, steel alloys, monels, etc., can be used. Two melts are prepared in separate crucibles 1 and 1a. One melt contains the matrix metal to which aluminum or some similar metal is added that has an affinity for oxygen. The other melt contains a stoichiometric quantity of an oxide such as copper oxide in the matrix metal. The molten metals are combined in holding vessel 2.

Two alternate methods for producing the finished product are available. The first process which requires a careful selection of the quantities of material in the melting crucibles is shown at 1. The molten metal from the holding vessel is solidified into ingot bars or rounds. The ingots are homogenized and utilized in the desired fashion. For example, the bars can be drawn into wire containing dispersed aluminum oxide by wire drawing procedures.

An alternate method for producing the finished product, shown at 11, requires that aluminum in excess of that to be oxidized be added to the melt in crucible 1. The molten metal from the holding vessel is fed to crucible 3 capable of rele...