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Browse Prior Art Database

Three Dimensional Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090412D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brown, DT: AUTHOR

Abstract

The three-dimensional display can be utilized for generating relief maps, models for engineering or architectural design, and models of mathematical functions. Molded plastic comb 1 has eighty teeth 2 corresponding to the eighty punch positions in each row of a punch card. The card has been shown exaggerated and schematically. The teeth are of equal length and have a cross-section slightly less than the hole in an punch card. A deck 3 of cards is prepared with every position punched in the top several cards and one of the plastic combs is inserted in each row of holes. The tab 4 on the comb holding teeth 2 together is then broken off and each tooth is pushed into the deck until it meets the first card that is not punched in its position.

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Three Dimensional Display

The three-dimensional display can be utilized for generating relief maps, models for engineering or architectural design, and models of mathematical functions. Molded plastic comb 1 has eighty teeth 2 corresponding to the eighty punch positions in each row of a punch card. The card has been shown exaggerated and schematically. The teeth are of equal length and have a cross- section slightly less than the hole in an punch card. A deck 3 of cards is prepared with every position punched in the top several cards and one of the plastic combs is inserted in each row of holes. The tab 4 on the comb holding teeth 2 together is then broken off and each tooth is pushed into the deck until it meets the first card that is not punched in its position. The deck is punched by a program so that the tops of teeth 2 approximate some desired surface. Displays of any size can be made by using an array of decks.

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