Browse Prior Art Database

I/O Macro

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090465D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Buonomo, JP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Exercising input/output devices associated with a computer is facilitated by this system. It includes a routine of micro-instructions which controls a selected I/O device. The micro-routine allows the operator to select any I/O device, designate the operation to be performed, and specify the quantity of data to be transferred. Other options include stepping through the sequence of micro-instructions a single instruction at a time. This facilitates the location of errors which may occur on a particular device. The system!is used with a micro-programmed central processing unit. The flow chart is descriptive of the system.

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I/O Macro

Exercising input/output devices associated with a computer is facilitated by this system. It includes a routine of micro-instructions which controls a selected I/O device. The micro-routine allows the operator to select any I/O device, designate the operation to be performed, and specify the quantity of data to be transferred. Other options include stepping through the sequence of micro- instructions a single instruction at a time. This facilitates the location of errors which may occur on a particular device. The system!is used with a micro- programmed central processing unit. The flow chart is descriptive of the system.

Block 1 initializes the CPU for operation of the I/O micro-program. Various circuits are conditioned to specify which traps are to be allowed. For example, a machine check trap is allowed so that machine checks can be properly handled and the program aborted. Block 2 provides for the manual entry of certain data. The operator manually dials in the data shown in Block 3. This operation is quite short, normally requiring less than a minute of operator time. Starting with Block 5, the CPU begins execution of the sequence of commands which are previously loaded into storage. This includes identification of the I/O channel to be used, selection of the particular device on the channel, and various other elections which are to be made.

Blocks 6...9 handle improper conditions which arise. In addition to the various actions which are shown as r...