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Plasma Sprayed Coatings Applied by Adhesive Transfer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090559D
Original Publication Date: 1969-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Blumentritt, BF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Coatings of highly wear and abrasion resistant material are commonly applied to various substrates by the plasma spraying process. This process is accomplished by introducing the coating material into a plasma in which the material is melted and accelerated onto the part being coated to form a high density coating upon impact. A limitation of the process is the failure of the sprayed material to form a strong bond with materials such as plastic. Plasma sprayed coatings can be applied to various substrates by first spraying the selected coating on a metal surface which defines the desired surface configuration of the finished part. The bond is made deliberately weak by the character of the surface finish, by coating with a foreign material or by a combination of these Practices.

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Plasma Sprayed Coatings Applied by Adhesive Transfer

Coatings of highly wear and abrasion resistant material are commonly applied to various substrates by the plasma spraying process. This process is accomplished by introducing the coating material into a plasma in which the material is melted and accelerated onto the part being coated to form a high density coating upon impact. A limitation of the process is the failure of the sprayed material to form a strong bond with materials such as plastic. Plasma sprayed coatings can be applied to various substrates by first spraying the selected coating on a metal surface which defines the desired surface configuration of the finished part.

The bond is made deliberately weak by the character of the surface finish, by coating with a foreign material or by a combination of these Practices. An adhesive is then applied to the sprayed coating and the coating is bonded to the part. The adhesive is then cured following which the metal backing is broken away from the coating which remains securely bonded to the part. In addition to the bonding, the surface character of the coating finally exposed is determined by the metal substrate surface on which the coating was sprayed. The surface thus achieved can be much smoother than plasma sprayed coatings applied directed to a part surface.

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