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Browse Prior Art Database

Self Adjusting Swivel Tip for Light Pen

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090589D
Original Publication Date: 1969-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Montedonico, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Video display devices are useful when an operator is able to identify portions of the display and communicate this identity to a central computer where the information displayed is in storage and can be identified to either alter the display or take some other affirmative action. The devices used for detecting light generally include photocells which, coupled with other position determining devices, indicate the coordinates or the location of the cell when it is triggered by a light source. In many instances, white light is used and photocells for detecting white light provide sufficient sensitivity to detect light with varying degrees of inclination of the probe with respect to the image surface.

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Self Adjusting Swivel Tip for Light Pen

Video display devices are useful when an operator is able to identify portions of the display and communicate this identity to a central computer where the information displayed is in storage and can be identified to either alter the display or take some other affirmative action. The devices used for detecting light generally include photocells which, coupled with other position determining devices, indicate the coordinates or the location of the cell when it is triggered by a light source. In many instances, white light is used and photocells for detecting white light provide sufficient sensitivity to detect light with varying degrees of inclination of the probe with respect to the image surface. However, in other instances white light is impractical and red light which is substantially invisible to the human eye is utilized. In these instances, the photocells employed for detecting the light are inadequate where the probe is not substantially normal to the image surface. Two techniques permit an operator greater latitude in positioning the light probe with respect to the display screen.

The first technique, drawing A, utilizes a flex tip which mounts an infrared filter and a photocell. The tip is positioned by a self-centering coiled spring which permits movement of the tip relative to the pen holder itself. With this arrangement, angles of up to 15 degrees from the normal are within the operable range.

The second techniq...