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Forming Metal Articles of Complex Shape

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090744D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chance, DA: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In the method, a green ceramic material is shaped, sintered, and subsequently infiltrated with copper. The fabricating of complex parts of refractory metals and copper is accomplished by first forming the article of a mixture of metal powders, such as M(0), of metal-containing powders, such as M(0)O(3), and a binder. The forming can be done by casting sheets and building up the article out of the sheets, by dry pressing of the green ceramic mixture, by extrusion through dies, or any other suitable method of shaping. The resultant form is subsequently sintered in a reducing atmosphere to a compact, but porous mass. In the sintering operation, oxides are reduced. The binder is vitalized leaving a skeleton-like shape of the metal. The shape is then immersed in molten copper to obtain capillary infiltration.

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Forming Metal Articles of Complex Shape

In the method, a green ceramic material is shaped, sintered, and subsequently infiltrated with copper. The fabricating of complex parts of refractory metals and copper is accomplished by first forming the article of a mixture of metal powders, such as M(0), of metal-containing powders, such as M(0)O(3), and a binder. The forming can be done by casting sheets and building up the article out of the sheets, by dry pressing of the green ceramic mixture, by extrusion through dies, or any other suitable method of shaping. The resultant form is subsequently sintered in a reducing atmosphere to a compact, but porous mass. In the sintering operation, oxides are reduced. The binder is vitalized leaving a skeleton-like shape of the metal. The shape is then immersed in molten copper to obtain capillary infiltration. The method can be utilized to produce any article, particularly articles having a complex shape. The method is adapted to the production of electronic elements having complex shapes as, for example, heat sinks for modules.

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