Browse Prior Art Database

Manufacturing Galvanic Increased Life Photomasks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090760D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kolbe, HF: AUTHOR

Abstract

The method consists of several steps. Conductive layer 2 is deposited on substrate 1 by a metal deposition method. Photoresist mask 3 is applied on layer 2, using, for example, the photoresist method. Metal mask 4 is deposited within the windows of layer 3 by electrolysis, using a pulse-shaped current. Presensitizing nuclei are applied on mask 4. The metal mask within the photoresist window is reinforced by electroless plating. Photoresist layer 3 is removed and there is curing or applying of a hard protective layer to the photomask.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 94% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Manufacturing Galvanic Increased Life Photomasks

The method consists of several steps. Conductive layer 2 is deposited on substrate 1 by a metal deposition method. Photoresist mask 3 is applied on layer 2, using, for example, the photoresist method. Metal mask 4 is deposited within the windows of layer 3 by electrolysis, using a pulse-shaped current. Presensitizing nuclei are applied on mask 4. The metal mask within the photoresist window is reinforced by electroless plating. Photoresist layer 3 is removed and there is curing or applying of a hard protective layer to the photomask.

Sputtered SiO(2) layers or vapor-deposited glasses having a low melting point, such as boron lead glass, which are heat-treated after application, are suitable as hard protective layers.

The described method of increasing the hardness or improving the surface characteristics of the masks has a number of disadvantages. For sputtering, the charges are small and the deposition times relatively long per charge. Glass plating frequently results in an uncontrollable distortion of the glass layer or the mask during tempering.

To eliminate these shortcomings, the mask that is to be scratch-proofed is coated on all sides, on one side or selectively, with indium or tin oxide. The metal oxides are generated by vapor reduction from the vapor phase of their chloride and are applied to the glasses by the reaction SnCl(4) + 2H(2)O- >SnO(2)+4HCl. Due to their conductivity, the scratch-resistant coatin...