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Browse Prior Art Database

Hot Melt Pressure Sensitive Adhesive Transfer Tape

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090840D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brackett, DW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a single operation a transfer tape transfers a hot-melt pressure-sensitive adhesive to the recessed shoulder of an aperture card and provides a protective release paper for the transferred and untransferred adhesive.

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Hot Melt Pressure Sensitive Adhesive Transfer Tape

In a single operation a transfer tape transfers a hot-melt pressure-sensitive adhesive to the recessed shoulder of an aperture card and provides a protective release paper for the transferred and untransferred adhesive.

A roll of laminar transfer tape 1, drawing A, comprises release paper substrate 2 with hot-melt pressure-sensitive adhesive layer 3 overcoated with protective coating 4 of noncontinuous chin thermoplastic film. Aperture card 5, drawing B, has recessed rectangular shoulder 6 abraded or otherwise provided around rectangular aperture 7. Chip 8 of tape 1 is cut from the roll, and a hollow rectangular hot-stamp die, not shown, applies heat and pressure through substrate 2 to removably secure the paper to shoulder 6 and overlie aperture 7. This hot stamping melts coating 4 around border 9 overlying shoulder 6, causing it to become mixed with and part of the adhesive formulation bonded to shoulder
6. Within the apertured area, coating 4 remains intact to prevent sticking of the adhesive to other cards.

Coating 4 preferably is a water-soluble or water-emulsifiable resin or other resin which solvent is non-miscible with adhesive coatings conventionally used. A typical emulsion formulation is, by weight, 60% Rhoplex B-60A and 40% Amberlac 165, product of Rohm & Haas. The former is a high molecular weight acrylic polymer emulsified in water. The latter is the water solution of a synthetic resin ammonium salt...