Browse Prior Art Database

Image Recording on Amorphous Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090842D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brodsky, MH: AUTHOR

Abstract

An image is recorded on a layer of amorphous silicon, drawing A, using a scanning beam of electrons or light to locally heat the amorphous silicon in the desired pattern. The reaction of the amorphous silicon to the heat treatment is shown in B. In an amorphous state the material is not transparent, but as heated, some transparency is produced resulting in a continuous tone scale. When the heating is sufficient to crystallize the silicon, an abrupt change to a high degree of transparency is effected. The image, with or without continuous tones according to the application, can be observed directly after recording or reproduced from the transparency. The layer of material can be prepared for reuse by heating and abruptly cooling to return the silicon to its initial amorphous state. Materials other than silicon can be used.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Image Recording on Amorphous Films

An image is recorded on a layer of amorphous silicon, drawing A, using a scanning beam of electrons or light to locally heat the amorphous silicon in the desired pattern. The reaction of the amorphous silicon to the heat treatment is shown in B. In an amorphous state the material is not transparent, but as heated, some transparency is produced resulting in a continuous tone scale. When the heating is sufficient to crystallize the silicon, an abrupt change to a high degree of transparency is effected. The image, with or without continuous tones according to the application, can be observed directly after recording or reproduced from the transparency. The layer of material can be prepared for reuse by heating and abruptly cooling to return the silicon to its initial amorphous state. Materials other than silicon can be used. Using different materials in combination can result in a full multicolor image. Each color can be produced using a different material with a different color in transmission and a different temperature for the opaque to transparent transition. Then each color can be separately written using beams of different energy.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]