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Induced Birefringent Storage Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090843D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Keller, SP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The display makes use of the property of certain cubic materials, optically isotropic, to respond to the combination of an applied electron beam and an electric field to produce induced local birefringence. The input electron beam causes electron hole pairs to be generated, which pairs are separated in a preferred orientation by the applied electron field. The carriers become trapped in a dipole orientation in which they remain when the beam and field are removed. In the portions of the material in which this local dipole orientation is produced, the material is birefringent and reflects incident polarized light differently from that which is normally reflected from the material in its cubic optically isotropic state.

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Induced Birefringent Storage Display

The display makes use of the property of certain cubic materials, optically isotropic, to respond to the combination of an applied electron beam and an electric field to produce induced local birefringence. The input electron beam causes electron hole pairs to be generated, which pairs are separated in a preferred orientation by the applied electron field. The carriers become trapped in a dipole orientation in which they remain when the beam and field are removed. In the portions of the material in which this local dipole orientation is produced, the material is birefringent and reflects incident polarized light differently from that which is normally reflected from the material in its cubic optically isotropic state.

In some materials, ultraviolet light can be used as the beam input to create the hole electron pairs which are aligned by the field. In the display shown, the information for the image is applied to the scanning electron beam. The two sets of vertically extending wires are imbedded in the normally isotropic material on the face of the tube to produce localized fields. As the beam scans and is modulated according to the image information, at each point where the beam produces hole electron pairs, the electric field aligns the dipoles no produce localized induced birefringence. Incident polarized light is applied to the face of this tube and reflected differently from the points of birefringence so that the image c...