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Magnetic Tape Buffer for On Line Data Acquisition System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090844D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Flachbart, RH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

At present, when using a remote terminal in the home loop mode of operation, a card punch or paper tape punch to record data from various interfaces is employed. Such card-stored or tape-stored data can later be read into a computer via a card reader when the remote terminal is operating on-line. This procedure is time'-consuming and requires many cards, as well as a card punch and card reader. Drawing 1 shows a system in which the block Experiment is a source of digitalized signals that produces the data to be processed. One type of experiment producing such digitalized outputs is the study of the Hall effect on a given material.

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Magnetic Tape Buffer for On Line Data Acquisition System

At present, when using a remote terminal in the home loop mode of operation, a card punch or paper tape punch to record data from various interfaces is employed. Such card-stored or tape-stored data can later be read into a computer via a card reader when the remote terminal is operating on-line. This procedure is time'-consuming and requires many cards, as well as a card punch and card reader. Drawing 1 shows a system in which the block Experiment is a source of digitalized signals that produces the data to be processed. One type of experiment producing such digitalized outputs is the study of the Hall effect on a given material.

The system in drawing 3 shows how a tape recorder can be used to record data and control signals from the Remote Terminal of drawing 1 when the computer is down. Then such tape recorder can be used to transmit recorded data and control signals to the computer without the necessity of passing data through the remote terminal a second time. Drawing 2 is representative of the particular setup of Interface 2. The first DATAphone* converts the remote terminal signals into tones which can be transmitted by telephone lines. Since the DATAphone signals are also suitable for tape-recording and such signals include control data as well as information data, they are recorded in sequence. In such case, a tape recorder, drawing 3, replaces the telephone line of drawing 2 in the recording of ou...