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Electronic Equipment Cooling Using MHD Flow of Coolant

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090879D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hwang, UP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The capacity of liquid cooling systems can be extended if the flowing coolant is a liquid metal. For example, mercury has a heat transfer coefficient ten times greater than water. Another advantage of using liquid metals is that a magnetohydrodynamic pump system can be utilized. Such a pumping system permits a modulation of the coolant flow and eliminates the inherent unreliability of liquid pumps caused by moving parts.

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Electronic Equipment Cooling Using MHD Flow of Coolant

The capacity of liquid cooling systems can be extended if the flowing coolant is a liquid metal. For example, mercury has a heat transfer coefficient ten times greater than water. Another advantage of using liquid metals is that a magnetohydrodynamic pump system can be utilized. Such a pumping system permits a modulation of the coolant flow and eliminates the inherent unreliability of liquid pumps caused by moving parts.

Electronic package 10 to be cooled is mounted on heat sink plate 12 where the heat is transferred to fluid 14 flowing through the plate. Fluid 14 is propelled by magnetohydrodynamic pump 16. After absorbing the thermal energy from package 10, fluid 14 passes through heat exchanger 18, where the temperature is lowered in preparation for another operating cycle. In applying an MHD pumping method, an electric current is passed through the fluid and a magnetic field is established normal to the current flow. The interaction of the magnetic and electrical field induces a Lorentz force which moves the fluid. The Lorentz force F can be expressed as the vector cross-produce of the current density J and the magnetic flux density B by F = J X B.

The current density can be modulated by controlling the input from power supply 20 and thus the driving force F and consequently the fluid velocity can be regulated. This is accomplished by servo system 22 which varies the fluid velocity as a function of the po...