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Electrophoretic Deposition of Etch Resists

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090893D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Marinace, JC: AUTHOR

Abstract

An etch resist is laid down in very fine patterns by electrophoretic deposition. The resist is resistant to very strong etching solutions. The pattern to be covered by the etch resist is first defined on a substrate having a conductive coating using conventional photoresist techniques. The masked substrate is placed in the emulsion and the etch resist is deposited only on the exposed conductive surfaces which are not covered by the mask. Thereafter, the mask is removed and etching steps performed. The electrophoretically deposited etch resist can be laid down in as fine patterns as the masking technique allows and still is capable of withstanding strong etching solutions. The emulsion for electrophoretic deposition is made using a lacquer type etch resist, e.g.

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Electrophoretic Deposition of Etch Resists

An etch resist is laid down in very fine patterns by electrophoretic deposition. The resist is resistant to very strong etching solutions. The pattern to be covered by the etch resist is first defined on a substrate having a conductive coating using conventional photoresist techniques. The masked substrate is placed in the emulsion and the etch resist is deposited only on the exposed conductive surfaces which are not covered by the mask. Thereafter, the mask is removed and etching steps performed. The electrophoretically deposited etch resist can be laid down in as fine patterns as the masking technique allows and still is capable of withstanding strong etching solutions. The emulsion for electrophoretic deposition is made using a lacquer type etch resist, e.g., MICCROSTOP*, which is dissolved in acetone and after which water is added. In some cases the electrophoretically deposited etch resist is too porous for the application. The porosity is eliminated, after thorough drying, by exposing the resist to acetone fumes above simmering acetone for about five seconds. The condensed acetone dissolves the incompletely coalesced particles in the resist.

As the acetone evaporates, the particles coalesce into a continuous nonporous layer. *Trademark of Michigan Chrome and Chemical Co.

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