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Ink for Printing on Polyurethane

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090906D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Goodman, HA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Because polyurethane films are characterized by the low degree of reactivity of the polymer molecules, strong chemical bonding of them with other materials is difficult to achieve. Because of the deficient bonding between polyurethane film and ink, ink characters tend to fade away. This is particularly true in the case of the characters for the Kanji keyboard which undergo continuous rubbing action by a stylus.

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Ink for Printing on Polyurethane

Because polyurethane films are characterized by the low degree of reactivity of the polymer molecules, strong chemical bonding of them with other materials is difficult to achieve. Because of the deficient bonding between polyurethane film and ink, ink characters tend to fade away. This is particularly true in the case of the characters for the Kanji keyboard which undergo continuous rubbing action by a stylus.

When a colloidal polyurethane-carbon-solvent system is applied to a clear polyurethane substrate, it leaves a permanent mark. The solvent acts as a link between the substrate and the ink to cause a strong bonding between both materials in each site of solvent attack. In addition, the pigment, i.e., the carbon particles, are intimately captured by the substrate at the bonding location.

The ink is formulated as follows: Solvent: tetrahydrofuran (C(4)H(8)O): one part by volume Polyurethane: 8 parts by weight
Carbon Powder: 2 parts by weight.

These materials are thoroughly mixed to form a viscous liquid. Inks of various colors can be obtained by changing the nature of the pigment. Such ink can be satisfactorily applied to a polyurethane film either by silk screening or through a stencil. After the ink is applied to the polyurethane film, it is oven-cured for several hours at about 70 degrees C to completely evaporate the solvent. As a result of such curing, there is produced a bond between the ink and the polyurethane material....