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Browse Prior Art Database

Forming a Stereo View

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090926D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pennington, KS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Three-dimensional scenes are coded by projecting grids of light upon the scene in such a fashion that an analysis of the scene is rapidly performed. A representation of a scene including a three-dimensional object coded by a projected light grid produced by a grating is shown in drawing I. This represents a recording of the received light taken in a receiving plane at some angle with the.position of the projection grating system.

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Forming a Stereo View

Three-dimensional scenes are coded by projecting grids of light upon the scene in such a fashion that an analysis of the scene is rapidly performed. A representation of a scene including a three-dimensional object coded by a projected light grid produced by a grating is shown in drawing I. This represents a recording of the received light taken in a receiving plane at some angle with the.position of the projection grating system.

The projection system is shown in drawing II where alpha is the slope of one member of a pencil of rays derived from the grating and kappa is the corresponding received slope.

Drawing II shows a diagram of the typical projection reception system. The grid is the opaque-transparent grating which modulates alpha. The object under illumination is represented by the-line y = m x + c.

Point P(x, y) satisfies three lines y = m x + c, x = alphay, and x = 2a - kappa


y.

This condition amounts to alpha -1 0 or kappa = - alpha>(2am/c)+|+(2a/c)...1 and d kappa/d alpha = ->(2 alpha m/c)+|...2 where kappa is a linear function of alpha. The scene enters the receiver in the m/c ratio.

Drawing III illustrates the case where the angle of the receiving plane can be varied. The analysis is referred to point B as origin.

A point on the receiving plane is z(x(1), y(1)). The equations y = n x + d and x = kappa y have to be satisfied simultaneously. Hence y(1) = d/(1+n kappa) and x(1) = -kappa d/(1+n kappa).

(Image Omitted)

Drawings 1 and II indicate that the grid, which can be a ronchi ruling or any reticle consisting of a collection of clear and opaque segments arranged in a wide variety of ways in one or two dimensions, spatially modulates the light incident upon the scene in a given or predictable fashion. The received image at point B, drawing III, contains the original reticle but with a spatial frequency modulation which is scene dependent. Spatial frequency filtering extracts those portions of the received image which have a given grid frequency superimposed on them. The slope of Planes in the image always appears as the ratio m/c, where m is the slope and c is the intercept with the y axis. Specific sets of planes, namely, those satisfyin...