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Thermo Compression Bonding of Connector Wires to HgCdTe Semiconductors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000090943D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hearn, EW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Semiconductor 10 rests on heated platform 11 along with flux pot 12. Lead wire 13 is held by thermocompression bonding capillary 14 for bonding to contact metal 15 deposited on the upper surface of semiconductor 10. For a HgCdTe semiconductor 10, contact metal 15 is a vacuum-evaporated gold-tin alloy in which the amount of tin is less than the eutectic percentage. Lead wire 13 is gold and flux 16 is a zinc chloride solution. The gold-tin alloy material alloys into the HgCdTe surface and provides a low ohmic contact. In the bonding process, semiconductor 10 is placed on platform 11 for preheating to a temperature below volatilizing temperature of mercury, preferably 60 degrees C. Capillary 14 is then preheated to approximately 300 degrees C.

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Thermo Compression Bonding of Connector Wires to HgCdTe Semiconductors

Semiconductor 10 rests on heated platform 11 along with flux pot 12. Lead wire 13 is held by thermocompression bonding capillary 14 for bonding to contact metal 15 deposited on the upper surface of semiconductor 10. For a HgCdTe semiconductor 10, contact metal 15 is a vacuum-evaporated gold-tin alloy in which the amount of tin is less than the eutectic percentage. Lead wire 13 is gold and flux 16 is a zinc chloride solution. The gold-tin alloy material alloys into the HgCdTe surface and provides a low ohmic contact. In the bonding process, semiconductor 10 is placed on platform 11 for preheating to a temperature below volatilizing temperature of mercury, preferably 60 degrees C. Capillary 14 is then preheated to approximately 300 degrees C. Heated wire 13 is then dipped into flux 16 and then pressed lightly onto contact metal 15 for a period of ~ five seconds while alloying of wire 13 and contact layer 15 takes place. This process produces bonds which have low ohmic resistance and strong mechanical properties.

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