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Manufacturing Laminated Structures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091008D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kehr, WD: AUTHOR

Abstract

Laminated structures of magnetically permeable metallic materials for use, for example, in magnetic heads, transformers, motors, and generators, are normally produced by adhesively bonding laminae together. Diffusion bonding of magnetically permeable metallic laminae provides magnetically superior laminated structures which exhibit improved permeability characteristics.

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Manufacturing Laminated Structures

Laminated structures of magnetically permeable metallic materials for use, for example, in magnetic heads, transformers, motors, and generators, are normally produced by adhesively bonding laminae together. Diffusion bonding of magnetically permeable metallic laminae provides magnetically superior laminated structures which exhibit improved permeability characteristics.

Diffusion bonding is accomplished by forming metallic, magnetically permeable material into laminae. A thin, nonconductive coating is provided on the facing portions of the laminae. The laminae are stacked in registered, contacting relationship and then subjected to heat for a time sufficient to cause diffusion of metallic material through the non-conductive coating from one lamina to the next adjacent lamina to form bonding tacks. Where diffusion bonding is carried out at sufficiently elevated temperatures on the order of 1100 degrees C, annealing of the laminae is obtained simultaneously with diffusion bonding. The resulting diffusion bonded, laminated structure is then placed into its ultimate use, or it may be further shaped and finished mechanically or chemically.

The thin, nonconductive coating on the facing portions of the laminae is simply formed by oxidation. This can be accomplished by placing the laminae in an oxidizing atmosphere and heating so that a thin, monolithic insulating oxide layer is formed on the surfaces of the laminae. For example, 1 mil...