Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Bonding to Diamond Surface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091012D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cuomo, JJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method relates to an arrangement for bonding to diamond surfaces where the diamond is, for example, to be used as a cutting tool or heat sink. One of the problems encountered in bonding to diamond surfaces is the inability to wet the diamond surface. A diamond can be made wettable by coating the diamond surface to be bonded with a layer of niobium. The layer of niobium of 5000 to 10,000 Angstroms can be obtained, for example, by RF sputtering with the substrate at 450 degrees C. After wetting the diamond surface, joining is accomplished by employing pure gold or the like as brazing material. During the joining process, crevices and voids are completely filled by the molten braze material thus providing a medium for continuous contact between the diamond and joined surface.

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Method for Bonding to Diamond Surface

This method relates to an arrangement for bonding to diamond surfaces where the diamond is, for example, to be used as a cutting tool or heat sink. One of the problems encountered in bonding to diamond surfaces is the inability to wet the diamond surface. A diamond can be made wettable by coating the diamond surface to be bonded with a layer of niobium. The layer of niobium of 5000 to 10,000 Angstroms can be obtained, for example, by RF sputtering with the substrate at 450 degrees C. After wetting the diamond surface, joining is accomplished by employing pure gold or the like as brazing material. During the joining process, crevices and voids are completely filled by the molten braze material thus providing a medium for continuous contact between the diamond and joined surface. Upon cooling intimate contact between the surfaces is maintained.

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