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Histology Specimen Slide

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091014D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Christiansen, RA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Glass microscope slides, especially for histology work, have the advantage of solvent and chemical resistance, and a high degree of optical transparency. They are, however, prone to breakage. Fabrication of glass slides for more complex usage than a simple flat slide entails undesirable handling problems. This histology specimen slide combines the properties of light weight and resistance to breakage resistance, is solvent and chemical resistant, and has a high degree of optical transparency. Basic slide 1 is made from allyl diglycol carbonate, a thermoset polymeric material. On one end of slide 1 is a layer of fluorocarbon film 2. Histology specimen 3 is then placed upon film 2, which is attached to the slide 1 by a pressure-sensitive adhesive.

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Histology Specimen Slide

Glass microscope slides, especially for histology work, have the advantage of solvent and chemical resistance, and a high degree of optical transparency. They are, however, prone to breakage. Fabrication of glass slides for more complex usage than a simple flat slide entails undesirable handling problems. This histology specimen slide combines the properties of light weight and resistance to breakage resistance, is solvent and chemical resistant, and has a high degree of optical transparency. Basic slide 1 is made from allyl diglycol carbonate, a thermoset polymeric material. On one end of slide 1 is a layer of fluorocarbon film 2. Histology specimen 3 is then placed upon film 2, which is attached to the slide 1 by a pressure-sensitive adhesive. Examination layers 2 and 4 are then peeled from slide 1 and can be stored in, for example, an aperture card for rapid data retrieval. Where preservation of the specimen is not needed, a flat specimen slide of allyl diglycol carbonate can be utilized as a direct replacement for current glass slides.

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