Browse Prior Art Database

Circuit Chip Substrate Attachment and Separation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091022D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Canestaro, MJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Thermal shocking and potential damage are avoided by attaching and separating circuit chips and supporting substrates at room temperature. A method of attaching the chips is to coat the heavy processing substrate with a tin-rich alloy layer and securing the ceramic circuit chip to the alloy layer with an adhesive resin, such as epoxy, which cures at room temperature. The circuit chip is removed from its substrate subsequent to processing by immersing the alloy layer in mercury. This allows amalgamation to occur, destroying the strength of the alloy to permit separation. Amalgamation at room temperature requires agitation of the mercury near the alloy interface to prevent saturation with the tin. The resin adhesive layer is then removed with standard solvents.

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Circuit Chip Substrate Attachment and Separation

Thermal shocking and potential damage are avoided by attaching and separating circuit chips and supporting substrates at room temperature. A method of attaching the chips is to coat the heavy processing substrate with a tin-rich alloy layer and securing the ceramic circuit chip to the alloy layer with an adhesive resin, such as epoxy, which cures at room temperature. The circuit chip is removed from its substrate subsequent to processing by immersing the alloy layer in mercury. This allows amalgamation to occur, destroying the strength of the alloy to permit separation. Amalgamation at room temperature requires agitation of the mercury near the alloy interface to prevent saturation with the tin. The resin adhesive layer is then removed with standard solvents.

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