Browse Prior Art Database

Formation of Palladium Contacts for Germanium Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091064D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kircher, CJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

The method is for obtaining a low-resistance ohmic contact to germanium semiconductor devices using palladium. The process includes these steps. Palladium is deposited on a clean germanium surface by vacuum evaporation or sputtering to a typical thickness of 100 angstroms - 500 angstroms. Palladium is reacted with germanium to form palladium germanide. This step can be accomplished either during or after palladium deposition. Typical formation temperatures are 200 - 400 degrees C. The unreacted palladium is removed with an etchant which does not attack the palladium germanide or other materials present. Potassium iodide plus iodine in H(2)O can be utilized. The contact realized eliminates the surface doping level and alloy control problems encountered with currently used silver-antimony contacts.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Formation of Palladium Contacts for Germanium Devices

The method is for obtaining a low-resistance ohmic contact to germanium semiconductor devices using palladium. The process includes these steps. Palladium is deposited on a clean germanium surface by vacuum evaporation or sputtering to a typical thickness of 100 angstroms - 500 angstroms. Palladium is reacted with germanium to form palladium germanide. This step can be accomplished either during or after palladium deposition. Typical formation temperatures are 200 - 400 degrees C. The unreacted palladium is removed with an etchant which does not attack the palladium germanide or other materials present. Potassium iodide plus iodine in H(2)O can be utilized. The contact realized eliminates the surface doping level and alloy control problems encountered with currently used silver-antimony contacts. Furthermore, no photoresist processing is required to delineate the contact material in the contact areas. As a result, the germanium surface is sealed by a contact material which is easily delineated to the exact contact window size. The contact surface encounters a minimum of processing before the top metal is deposited.

1