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Ceramic Substrate with Inherent Heat Exchanger

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091115D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pilgram, HR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Ceramic substrates as carriers of active semiconductor components, for example, diodes, transistors and integrated circuit chips, in addition to carrying printed or internal connection wiring, act as heat sinks for transferring energy losses to the cooling medium. Doe to the limited heat transfer properties, the total thermal energy loss for a given substrate determines the semiconductor packaging density and the permissible current value in the conductors.

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Ceramic Substrate with Inherent Heat Exchanger

Ceramic substrates as carriers of active semiconductor components, for example, diodes, transistors and integrated circuit chips, in addition to carrying printed or internal connection wiring, act as heat sinks for transferring energy losses to the cooling medium. Doe to the limited heat transfer properties, the total thermal energy loss for a given substrate determines the semiconductor packaging density and the permissible current value in the conductors.

In order to increase the transfer of thermal energy to the cooling medium, it is necessary to increase the transfer surface between the ceramics and the coolant. This is achieved by adding a ceramic honeycomb heat exchanger to the surface facing the component side. This exchanger fills the space between adjoining substrates and ensures an increased transfer surface without appreciably increasing the total packaging density. As the heat exchanger is made of the same material as the substrate, thermal stresses occurring as a result of differences in expansion are avoided. It is also possible to connect two substrates back-to-back to improve the temperature balance in the stack and to provide a duct for the coolant.

Glazed frit or metal can be used for bonding the substrate and the heat exchanger. Bonding can be carried out concurrently with the substrate metallization process.

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