Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Negative Photoresist

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091119D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clecak, NJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A compound, 2,6-diazido-9, 10-anthroquinone can be readily incorporated into a standard photoresist formulation. The compound, when exposed and developed, produces excellent images which can be used in the production of micro-electronic devices.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Negative Photoresist

A compound, 2,6-diazido-9, 10-anthroquinone can be readily incorporated into a standard photoresist formulation. The compound, when exposed and developed, produces excellent images which can be used in the production of micro-electronic devices.

In the method of preparation of this compound, 2.3 g., 0.01 mole, of 2,6-diaminoanthroquinone is dissolved in 50 cc. of water and 20 cc. of concentrated hydrochloric acid. The solution is cooled to 5 degrees C and 4 ml. of a 5N solution of sodium nitrite in water is added dropwise to the amine slurry. The diazo solution is filtered and the filtrate is treated with 10 g. of sodium azide in 100 cc. of water. The resultant precipitate is filtered and washed with water. The yellow solids weigh 0.5 g. after recrystallizing from dioxane and drying. Analysis of this material is as follows: Cacld. for C(14)H(6)N(6)O(3): C, 57.93; H, 2.08; N, 28.95.

Found: C, 57.90; H, 2.08; N, 28.98.

A typical formulation for use of this compound as a photoresist is as follows: 20 g. of cyclized polyisoprene

1.5 g. of 2,6-diazido-9,10-anthroquinone

Dissolved in 100 ml. of xylene.

This solution is coated on a suitable substrate to a thickness of 1-2 microns and is exposed through a pattern for 3.0 seconds to the unfiltered light from a mercury arc at a distance of 6 inches. The image is developed in xylene. The resolution of the resultant image is in the order of 2 to 10 microns.

1