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Marking Ink for Ceramic Slider

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091139D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Parks, WM: AUTHOR

Abstract

The marking ink is composed of platinum, ball-point pen ink, preferably black, aqua regia, which is a mixture of nitric acid and hydrochloric acid, and ethyl alcohol. The ink composition has the ability to withstand ultrasonic cleaning, which is often applied to electronic parts. To manufacture the ink, one decigram of platinum is dissolved in aqua regia, adding acid as necessary for complete dissolution. The platinum solution is evaporated until only solids remain, and the solids are crushed to a fine powder. One milliliter of black ball-point ink is added to the fine powder and mixed thoroughly. The viscosity of the mixture is then adjusted with ethyl alcohol. The composition can be applied with a very fine brush or sharp toothpick, and the ink is then allowed to dry on the object that is marked.

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Marking Ink for Ceramic Slider

The marking ink is composed of platinum, ball-point pen ink, preferably black, aqua regia, which is a mixture of nitric acid and hydrochloric acid, and ethyl alcohol. The ink composition has the ability to withstand ultrasonic cleaning, which is often applied to electronic parts. To manufacture the ink, one decigram of platinum is dissolved in aqua regia, adding acid as necessary for complete dissolution. The platinum solution is evaporated until only solids remain, and the solids are crushed to a fine powder. One milliliter of black ball- point ink is added to the fine powder and mixed thoroughly. The viscosity of the mixture is then adjusted with ethyl alcohol. The composition can be applied with a very fine brush or sharp toothpick, and the ink is then allowed to dry on the object that is marked. The object is then fired to a desired temperature. The mark is either black or silver, depending on the temperature used.

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