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Browse Prior Art Database

Read Write Gap Formation with Glass

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091140D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pal, GS: AUTHOR

Abstract

This technique for forming glass gaps in a ferrite transducer utilizes the principle of Couette flow or simple shear flow. Higher glass flowing velocity can be achieved by reducing the processing time. As a result, adverse chemical action between the glass and ferrite is minimized. Furthermore, gap filling is more reliable than when achieved with capillary soaking, since, with this process, glass flows more readily into surface pits and recesses.

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Read Write Gap Formation with Glass

This technique for forming glass gaps in a ferrite transducer utilizes the principle of Couette flow or simple shear flow. Higher glass flowing velocity can be achieved by reducing the processing time. As a result, adverse chemical action between the glass and ferrite is minimized. Furthermore, gap filling is more reliable than when achieved with capillary soaking, since, with this process, glass flows more readily into surface pits and recesses.

The flow velocity component due to the pressure gradient, caused by surface tension as in capillary soaking methods, is negligible compared with the flow velocity component resulting from wall movement velocity in this method. The wall movement of fluid glass 10 can be implemented by motor 12. This drives micrometer screw 14 (40 tpi) incorporated in a fixture in which ferrite pole pieces 16 are mounted. A relative sliding motion is allowed in the plane of the shimmed gap.

The advantages of the shear-force gap forming process are higher glass flowing velocity, reduction in process time with minimization of adverse chemical reaction between the glass and ferrite, more reliable gap filling of surface imperfections, elimination of irregularities in the wavefront progression of glass flow, use of higher temperature for gapping and reduced process time, and elimination of polishing.

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