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Transparent Electrodes of Sputtered ZnO

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091194D
Original Publication Date: 1969-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kay, E: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This technique is for making transparent conducting ZnO films at low temperatures by sputtering. A standard RF glow discharge sputtering technique is employed for the production of ZnO films. A 4 inch diameter by 1/4-inch thick ZnO disk with a purity of 99.9% is RF sputtered at an input power of 400 watts in an argon atmosphere at a pressure of 40 x 10/-3/ torr. Films are deposited onto substrates mounted on a temperature controlled grounded plate located 3.1 cm from the target. ZnO films are deposited at a rate of 20 angstroms/sec onto quartz substrates held at room temperature. The films as deposited have room temperature conductivities of 10/-3/ ohm cm/-1/ and have a high degree of transparency, such that films 0.1 micron thick transmit 90% of visible light.

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Transparent Electrodes of Sputtered ZnO

This technique is for making transparent conducting ZnO films at low temperatures by sputtering. A standard RF glow discharge sputtering technique is employed for the production of ZnO films. A 4 inch diameter by 1/4-inch thick ZnO disk with a purity of 99.9% is RF sputtered at an input power of 400 watts in an argon atmosphere at a pressure of 40 x 10/-3/ torr. Films are deposited onto substrates mounted on a temperature controlled grounded plate located 3.1 cm from the target. ZnO films are deposited at a rate of 20 angstroms/sec onto quartz substrates held at room temperature. The films as deposited have room temperature conductivities of 10/-3/ ohm cm/-1/ and have a high degree of transparency, such that films 0.1 micron thick transmit 90% of visible light. In addition, these films are uniform and are optically free of cracks. Thus, by removing an external source of oxygen, ZnO films are grown by sputtering with conductivities as much as ten orders of magnitude higher than are obtained with a partial pressure of oxygen. The high conductivity is attained while maintaining a high degree of transparency. In addition, this method offers the advantage that films can be deposited at room temperature at the high rate of 20 angstroms/sec.

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