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Silane Precoat Technique for Photoresist Adhesion

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091258D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Couture, RA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Enhanced photoresist adhesion to semiconductor, e.g., silicon dioxide, surfaces to be masked is obtained by using dimethylchlorosilane to precoat the semiconductor surface before applying the photoresist. The method consists of applying a solution of one part by weight of dimethylchlorosilane in ten parts by weight of trichlorethylene or other suitable organic solvent to the surface of a semiconductor wafer, spinning off the excess solution, and then applying the desired photoresist such as KTFR resist, a product of Eastman Kodak Co.

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Silane Precoat Technique for Photoresist Adhesion

Enhanced photoresist adhesion to semiconductor, e.g., silicon dioxide, surfaces to be masked is obtained by using dimethylchlorosilane to precoat the semiconductor surface before applying the photoresist. The method consists of applying a solution of one part by weight of dimethylchlorosilane in ten parts by weight of trichlorethylene or other suitable organic solvent to the surface of a semiconductor wafer, spinning off the excess solution, and then applying the desired photoresist such as KTFR resist, a product of Eastman Kodak Co.

The application of dimethylchlorosilane results in a molecular layer of organosiloxane which enhances adhesion of the photoresist to the semiconductor wafer. Best results are obtained when the excess dimethylchlorosilane solution is spun off, rather than applied by dipping or vapor deposition techniques. The dimethylchlorosilane solution is desirably applied in a steady stream to completely coat the wafers with the precoat solution.

The wafer is then spun at about 4,000 rpm for approximately 15 seconds to remove excess silane precoat. There results a linear polyorganosiloxane of monomolecular thickness on the semiconductor wafer surface. All biproducts of the dimethylchlorosilane are gaseous. No organosiloxane polymers are formed on the application equipment. After application of the silane precoat, the photoresist is applied in the normal manner.

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