Browse Prior Art Database

Energy Difference Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091282D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Millham, EH: AUTHOR

Abstract

This circuit provides a stable state output whenever there is sufficient energy difference between two input pulses. The circuit is particularly adapted for test applications such as automatic waveform analyses and propagation delay tests. Additional applications are in error-detection circuitry such as clock monitors and in medium level signal amplification. The detector is constructed of four basic building blocks, Amplifier, Rectifier, Pulse Shaper, and Trigger, interconnected to perform the functions at high speeds with a large degree of flexibility.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 75% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Energy Difference Detector

This circuit provides a stable state output whenever there is sufficient energy difference between two input pulses. The circuit is particularly adapted for test applications such as automatic waveform analyses and propagation delay tests. Additional applications are in error-detection circuitry such as clock monitors and in medium level signal amplification. The detector is constructed of four basic building blocks, Amplifier, Rectifier, Pulse Shaper, and Trigger, interconnected to perform the functions at high speeds with a large degree of flexibility.

The Amplifier achieves a fast switching rate by using a positive feedback into a constant current source. This keeps the current through R1 and R2 relatively constant although the inputs are changing until a difference is present. When a difference occurs, e.g., A>B, then T1 conducts and T2 tends to turn off causing an increase in the current through R1 and a decrease in R2. This difference is fed back in phase to cause T5 to conduct harder which further decreases the current in R2. The signals at the collectors of T3 and T4 are amplified and out of phase with each other. The Rectifier algebraically sums the signals and presents this difference to C1. The latter couples the difference signal to the Pulse Shaper which differentiates the signal. This shaped pulse causes the Trigger to switch with a negative-going pulse. The trigger is supplied with a DC reset which allows selective sampli...