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Solid State Infrared Scanner Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091289D
Original Publication Date: 1967-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wetzell, HB: AUTHOR

Abstract

Two-dimensional, solid-state infrared detector 10 comprises plural photo-voltaic linear scanistor arrays 11, 12, and 13, mounted on a single substrate 14. Each scanistor array is formed of plural back-to-back photodiodes and blocking diodes. The photodiodes have their anodes connected to various points on a distributed resistor and the anodes of the blocking diodes have a common connection. Scanistor array 11 comprises a P-type silicon wafer 15 having N regions 16 and 17. Plural linear horizontally arranged P-type regions 18 in the N region 17 form photodiodes connected by crossover conductors 20 deposited over an isolation layer to blocking diodes, P regions 19, formed in N region 16. A deposited bus connector 21 having a distributed resistance characteristic forms a common connection for the photodiodes.

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Solid State Infrared Scanner Device

Two-dimensional, solid-state infrared detector 10 comprises plural photo- voltaic linear scanistor arrays 11, 12, and 13, mounted on a single substrate 14. Each scanistor array is formed of plural back-to-back photodiodes and blocking diodes. The photodiodes have their anodes connected to various points on a distributed resistor and the anodes of the blocking diodes have a common connection. Scanistor array 11 comprises a P-type silicon wafer 15 having N regions 16 and 17. Plural linear horizontally arranged P-type regions 18 in the N region 17 form photodiodes connected by crossover conductors 20 deposited over an isolation layer to blocking diodes, P regions 19, formed in N region 16. A deposited bus connector 21 having a distributed resistance characteristic forms a common connection for the photodiodes. Conductive lands 22 and 23, located at opposite ends of N region 16, provide electrical connection to the anodes of blocking diodes 19.

Scanistor array 12, in the same manner, has N regions 26 and 27 in P type wafer 25. P regions 28 and 29 form photodiodes and blocking diodes, respectively, with crossover conductors 30 at bus connector 31 on region 27 and external connection lands 32 and 33 on N region 26.

Scanistor array 13, likewise, has N regions 36 and 37 on P type wafer 35 with P regions 38 and 39 forming photodiodes and blocking diodes, respectively, with crossover conductors 40 at bus connector 41 on region 37 and external lands 42 and 43 on N region 46.

On each scanistor, the P type wafers are silicon doped with arsenic to form the N regions. The blocking diode P regions are formed by diffusing boron material. The photodiode regions are formed by the diffusion of arsenic or antimony in the N regions. The discrete pattern of the N and P regions, along with the formation of the conductive overlays, is obtained by well-known masking techniques.

The scanning circuitry comprises sweep generator 50 with an output lead connected to lands 23, 33, and 43 of the arrays 11, 12, and 13, respectively, to provide a horizontal scanning of the array. Sweep generator 50 is operated by timing generator 52 which gates pulses, of a free-running clock 53, on a predetermined activating signal. Generator 52 is also connected to ring counter 54, the output of the various stages being connected to the base of transistors 55, 56, and 57. The latter operate through transformers 58, 59, and 60 to turn on SCR's 61, 62, and 63 of array switches 64, 65, and 6...