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Optical Light Pipe

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091302D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Radovsky, DA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

When opaque irradiated polyethylene is heated above its crystalline melting point to approximately 250 degrees F at which point the polyethylene becomes transparent and elastomeric, and ultraviolet rays are focused on one end of the polyethylene specimen, orange/red light emerges at the other end of the specimen and along the exposed edges. Further, when the rubbery specimen is bent in a 90 degrees angle, the orange/red light follows the curvature of the part. Solid opaque polyethylene irradiated or unirradiated at room temperature does not show the effect.

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Optical Light Pipe

When opaque irradiated polyethylene is heated above its crystalline melting point to approximately 250 degrees F at which point the polyethylene becomes transparent and elastomeric, and ultraviolet rays are focused on one end of the polyethylene specimen, orange/red light emerges at the other end of the specimen and along the exposed edges. Further, when the rubbery specimen is bent in a 90 degrees angle, the orange/red light follows the curvature of the part. Solid opaque polyethylene irradiated or unirradiated at room temperature does not show the effect.

When regular white light is focused on one end of the heated transparent specimen of irradiated polyethylene, a more intense orange/ red light emerges at the opposite end and along the exposed edges. This light also follows the curvature of a 90 degrees bend, and the intensity of the orange/red light increases with increased dosage of the specimen.

Irradiated polyethylene can also be caused to become transparent by heating and sudden chilling in liquid nitrogen. A hot iron can be caused to draw a melted pattern portion prior to immersion in liquid nitrogen. The continuous transparent region at room temperature also shows a light pipe effect when white light is focused on one end. This effect is realized, however, to a lesser degree than when the material is heated. Unirradiated polyethylene in heated transparent condition shows somewhat similar types of light pipe effects as the irradiated m...