Browse Prior Art Database

3 D Exposure System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091317D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mathisen, ES: AUTHOR

Abstract

This method is for photomasking or photoprinting of a three-dimensional pattern on a 3-D object utilizing holographic techniques. The method involves the reproduction of every side or phase of a prototype of a desired object on separate holographic plates, according to conventional holographic techniques. Reproduction of an image of the 3-D object is achieved by superimposing the real image from these holographic plates. The latter are arranged in such a manner that the projected images intersect to form the reconstructed 3-D object. By placing a photoresist-coated object at this intersection, the photoresist is exposed on all sides of the object according to the holographically produced pattern. The 3-D object containing the exposed pattern is then processed in a conventional manner.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

3 D Exposure System

This method is for photomasking or photoprinting of a three-dimensional pattern on a 3-D object utilizing holographic techniques. The method involves the reproduction of every side or phase of a prototype of a desired object on separate holographic plates, according to conventional holographic techniques. Reproduction of an image of the 3-D object is achieved by superimposing the real image from these holographic plates. The latter are arranged in such a manner that the projected images intersect to form the reconstructed 3-D object. By placing a photoresist-coated object at this intersection, the photoresist is exposed on all sides of the object according to the holographically produced pattern. The 3-D object containing the exposed pattern is then processed in a conventional manner.

The drawings show an application of the method to the manufacture of core windings on toroid transformers. This method is also suited for other applications where printing or pattern exposure for further processing is required for selective etching or evaporation of permanent or semipermanent information storage. The principle of operation is based upon a technique of wavefront reconstruction using holograms and expands on techniques already in existence.

Shown in A is a pulse transformer of which a model of the device for the desired pattern is set up as shown in B. Two equal monochromatic spatial coherent light beams 2 and 3 illuminate the object, master, 1 to be photographed. Reflected light from object 1 exposes photographic plates 4 and 5. These are placed at some convenient and noncritical distance from object 1. Mirrors 6 and 7, located adjacent to object 1, intercept a portion of beams 2 and 3 and reflect these onto the plates 4 and 5 to provide the reference beams. Plates 4 and 5, when developed, contain both amplitude and phase information in the form of a fringe pattern, a hologram. A reconstruction of original object 1 as an image is made by the setup shown in C.

Holograms 4 and 5 are illuminated with two light beams 8 and 9 similar to 2 and 3. An observer sees the virtual image as a true 3-D reproduction of original object 1. A real image from the 9-5 system is formed in front of plate 5 at position 10. Similarly for system 8-4, the real image of the rear view of object 1 is formed at position...