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Browse Prior Art Database

Fabrication of Metal Masks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091324D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wirtz, LH: AUTHOR

Abstract

The method is for the fabrication of a copper-nickel mask which can be used in the photoresist processing of electronic components. The mask is fabricated by first coating one side of glass substrate 1 with file 2 of photoresist in the form of an adhesive paste as in A. This is followed by depositing thin layer 3 of electroless copper on the photoresist base and then electroplating the copper with a nickel layer 4, as in B, to give the desired optical density and hardness. The composite can then be processed for the delineation of a pattern by conventional photolithographic techniques. Layer 4, as in C, can be spin-coated with layer 5 of photoresist which is then suitably exposed in the desired pattern defined by unexposed regions 6, developed and etched through the composite coatings as in D.

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Fabrication of Metal Masks

The method is for the fabrication of a copper-nickel mask which can be used in the photoresist processing of electronic components. The mask is fabricated by first coating one side of glass substrate 1 with file 2 of photoresist in the form of an adhesive paste as in A. This is followed by depositing thin layer 3 of electroless copper on the photoresist base and then electroplating the copper with a nickel layer 4, as in B, to give the desired optical density and hardness. The composite can then be processed for the delineation of a pattern by conventional photolithographic techniques. Layer 4, as in C, can be spin-coated with layer 5 of photoresist which is then suitably exposed in the desired pattern defined by unexposed regions 6, developed and etched through the composite coatings as in D.

For example, a clean glass plate can be spin-coated with undiluted KPR*-2 at 5,000 rpm for 30 seconds. The resist-coated glass plate is then oven-baked at 180 degrees C for 30 minutes. This is followed, after cooling, by conditioning the plate in Ethone** Conditioner No. 470 for 4 minutes followed by a rinse in DI water. The conditioned plate is then immersed in 15% hydrochloric acid for 1 minute, followed by an immersion in Ethone** No. 432 Sensitizer for 1 minute with a subsequent rinse in DI water.

The rinsed assembly is then immersed in Ethone** No. 440 Activater for 1 minute, and followed by a rinse in DI water. The plate is then electroless...