Browse Prior Art Database

Chip Handler

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091400D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aronstein, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

The semiconductor chip handler operates in a rotary mode of indexing which is perpendicular to the flow direction of an aligned row of chips. Preorientated semiconductor chips are picked up for the purpose of either testing and sorting or subsequent assembly or both.

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Chip Handler

The semiconductor chip handler operates in a rotary mode of indexing which is perpendicular to the flow direction of an aligned row of chips. Preorientated semiconductor chips are picked up for the purpose of either testing and sorting or subsequent assembly or both.

The handler includes a rotary index disk 1 with several chip-holding fixtures 2, one fixture for each index position, i.e., 8 chip-holders for an 8-position head, drawing A. During the developed portion of a cycle, when disk is not rotating, a fixture is directly above the first chip 4, drawings B, C, D, and E, in line at the pickup point of vibratory feed bowl 3. Vacuum is supplied at an hole 5 in fixture 2 and a chip is thus clamped to the fixture. Disk 1 is then indexed such that the chip is removed from the line of chips in a direction perpendicular to the flow of chips into the pickup point. The picked up chip stops at each index station in sequence where various operations can be performed such as aligning, contacting, etc.

At an appropriate station prior to the chip-holding fixture returning to the pick up station, positive pressure is applied instead of vacuum at hole 5. The chip is ejected into a sorter in the case of a test system or transferred to a module or another machine element in the case of a chip placement machine.

A chip-holding fixture 2 is shown in more detail in drawing B. It includes a drive lip 6 to provide the force to push the chip through either the alignment station or contacting station or both. In general, there are as many chip-holding fixtures as there are index stops of the shaft per revolution and they are equally spaced around the perimeter. This is not a necessary requirement, however, since the particular arrangement can be tailored to a particular application. An 8- stop indexer uses a corresponding set of 8 chip-holding fixtures on the indexing disk.

Feeder bowl 3 is a conventional vibratory feed bowl. The sole requirement for the feeder is that it provide preorientated parts at a specific pickup point at a rate consistent with the through-put rate of the machine. For a handler shown, this feeder bowl is adapted for feeding of 3-ball...