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Browse Prior Art Database

Loom Operating System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091409D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bonin, AM: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A loom serves as a top-priority output device for a time-shared data processing system that includes a graphic weave designing station as an on-line input device.

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Loom Operating System

A loom serves as a top-priority output device for a time-shared data processing system that includes a graphic weave designing station as an on-line input device.

The loom communicates with the rest of the system through an adapter including a data control unit, such as the one described in IBM publication A22- 6868-2, and a specially programmed multiplexor channel. The data control unit is coupled through its electronic contact operating ECO facility to solenoids that control the heddle settings in the loom. A cam contact on the loom intermittently generates a signal demanding a row of weave design data. In response to each such demand the data control unit transmits an external sync signal to the multiplexor channel. The channel is programmed so that it causes a row of data to be transmitted to the data control unit in response to each sync signal received from such unit. The transmitted data can consist alternately of all 0's for positively resetting the heddle solenoids and a row of data to be woven into cloth.

The nature of the loom operation is such that the loom cannot wait even momentarily for the row of data which it has demanded. It is impracticable, however, to have the central processor interrupted every time the loom wants to weave an individual row of the cloth which it is manufacturing. To avoid such frequent interruption of the processor, two buffer stores are provided, each being capable of holding four rows of weave design data. These buffers are alternately emptied and replenished from main storage under the control of chained channel command words CCW's. The latter are utilized in synchronism with the loom operations. The buffers are part of core storage. When a buffer is to be replenished, the channel program furnishes a program-controlled interrupt PCI signal to the processor. This signal is generated under the control of a program- controlled interrupt PCI flag bit which is in the channel command word next following the CCW that causes the last row of data to be read out of the buffer. This PCI request simulates a conventional I/O device-end signal, which the loom is incapable of generating, and as a rule it is honored immediately by the processor for causing the buffer to be filled with new data from disk storage.

If for some reason the processor...