Browse Prior Art Database

Control and Monitoring of Laser Metalworking Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091454D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Huang, SS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Laser metalworking apparatus 10 connects integrated chip 12 to substrate 14 or substrate lead 16 to metal connecting strip 18. High-intensity light source 20 directs light through condenser lens 22, fifty percent optical beam splitter 24, hard dielectric beam splitter 26, and primary focusing objective lens 28 to the focal location or target area. Light beam 30 impinges on strip 18 and is reflected vertically back through lens 28 and beam splitter 26 to beam splitter 24. Here a portion of the reflected light is directed through back objective lens 32 to another beam splitter 34 and thence to light sensitive oscillator 36. When the latter senses the reflection from the target, laser 38 is triggered and its beam is reflected by beam splitter 26 through lens 28 onto the target area.

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Control and Monitoring of Laser Metalworking Systems

Laser metalworking apparatus 10 connects integrated chip 12 to substrate 14 or substrate lead 16 to metal connecting strip 18.

High-intensity light source 20 directs light through condenser lens 22, fifty percent optical beam splitter 24, hard dielectric beam splitter 26, and primary focusing objective lens 28 to the focal location or target area. Light beam 30 impinges on strip 18 and is reflected vertically back through lens 28 and beam splitter 26 to beam splitter 24. Here a portion of the reflected light is directed through back objective lens 32 to another beam splitter 34 and thence to light sensitive oscillator 36. When the latter senses the reflection from the target, laser 38 is triggered and its beam is reflected by beam splitter 26 through lens 28 onto the target area.

In order to effect an automatic metalworking operation, the workpiece piece at the target area can be mounted on an X-Y table, driven by a suitable mechanism. In this arrangement, oscillator 36 is utilized to control laser 38, thus reducing feeding errors normally associated with stop-and-go X-Y tables.

Closed-circuit television is provided to visually monitor the metalworking process. This arrangement includes television camera 40, field lens 42, and protective filter 44. Also included, at a remote location, is a television monitor screen shown. Apparatus 10 can be used for any laser metalworking applications in which discrete light-r...