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One Step Holocoder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091505D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lohmann, AW: AUTHOR

Abstract

A holographic technique which simulates a large number of small lenses can be used to record and reproduce three dimensional images with an incoherent light source. These techniques use a fly's-eye lens, also termed a holocoder. One difficulty which is encountered when using such technique is that the images which are produced are pseudoscopic. This means that the relative depth position of points in the image is inverted with respect to their position in the image. Pseudoscopic images are objectively wrong and are subjectively confusing.

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One Step Holocoder

A holographic technique which simulates a large number of small lenses can be used to record and reproduce three dimensional images with an incoherent light source. These techniques use a fly's-eye lens, also termed a holocoder. One difficulty which is encountered when using such technique is that the images which are produced are pseudoscopic. This means that the relative depth position of points in the image is inverted with respect to their position in the image. Pseudoscopic images are objectively wrong and are subjectively confusing.

The pseudoscopic quality of the images can be eliminated by using the image from a first holocoder as an object for a second holocoder. Such a system results in an orthoscopic image since two ortho-to pseudoscopic conversions in sequence cancel each other out. However, such a system requires two photographic recording processes. Two techniques are described for optically performing a plurality of ortho-to-pseudoscopic conversions in series, thus eliminating the need for two photographic steps. This is effected in either a transmission mode or in a reflected mode.

Each technique uses a series of cat's-eye reflectors. In the upper drawing, each cat's-eye reflector consists of one half of a cube, positioned so that light enters upon the cube's diagonal. Light entering the cat' s-eye reflector is returned in the same direction as the incident light, but shifted by a small amount.

Each technique for achieving two ortho-to-pseudoscopic conversions involves a recording step and a reconstruction step. In the recording step of the first technique, object 3 is photographed through fly's eye lens 4. This is accomplished by placing lens 4 in front of photographic film 5. The shutter and other mechanisms of the camera are not shown since these are conventional.

The reconstruction part of the first technique utilizes light source 9, fly's-eye lens 10, beam splitter 11, and cat's-eye reflector 12. The elements are positioned so that the light passes through the film, through lens 10 to splitter 11 and to reflect...