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Film Supported Probe for the AC Pulse Testing of Integrated Circuits

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091514D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dill, FH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

One problem encountered in the production of subnanosecond integrated circuits, is the nondestructive testing of the AC characteristics of the circuit. Most probes are not capable of making AC pulse measurements. High-speed measurements are now made with wire-bonded chips in special jigs.

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Film Supported Probe for the AC Pulse Testing of Integrated Circuits

One problem encountered in the production of subnanosecond integrated circuits, is the nondestructive testing of the AC characteristics of the circuit. Most probes are not capable of making AC pulse measurements. High-speed measurements are now made with wire-bonded chips in special jigs.

This probe enables the pulse testing of subnanosecond integrated circuits while still in wafer form. A probe supported on a flexible film material such as polyamide film has a number of advantages. First, high-quality transmission lines can, if needed, be carried up to the test pads on the chip or area tested. This is vital to AC or pulse measurement. These strip transmission lines can be built on the film and the loss held down by making their length short. Second, exceedingly high-contact densities can be achieved since the contacts are formed in relatively thin metal films by photoresist processes. Third, tests can be made to semiconductor wafers, chips, or other structures such as thin-film memories or packages. Fourth, resistors can, if necessary, be carried as thin- film resistors on the test probe. Fifth, good visibility for probe alignment can be maintained since the probe can be made transparent and thin enough to be used under relatively high-power microscopes. Good visibility is obtained up to 100X. Additionally, reasonable probe durability and low contact resistance can be obtained. Also, sufficient vertical compliance can be obtained so that thin-film device pads, solder ball, or solder pad structures can be tested. Another important advantage is that a great deal of flexibility in arrangement is allowed a film supported probe.

A sectional drawing of a two-contact probe is shown. Contacts 1 and 2 and conductors 3 and 4 are formed by photoresist and etching processes on metallized film 5 or its equivalent. Hard plated contacts can be built up locally by plating...