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Low Inertia High Speed Reversing Motor Armature

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091557D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Peter, AE: AUTHOR

Abstract

A low inertia, high-speed reversing motor armature can be fabricated by electroforming the circuit on both sides of a dielectric sleeve. The inner circuit for the armature is electroformed on thin, stainless steel cylindrical band 1 that is expanded to a diameter slightly below its yield point by expandable mandrel 2. Copper layer 3 is next applied to the outside diameter of band 1 and the circuit pattern is formed by etching. The exposed band 1 is next flash-coated with copper to facilitate later removal of band 1. An epoxy or suitable dielectric layer 4 is next applied over the flash coating.

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Low Inertia High Speed Reversing Motor Armature

A low inertia, high-speed reversing motor armature can be fabricated by electroforming the circuit on both sides of a dielectric sleeve. The inner circuit for the armature is electroformed on thin, stainless steel cylindrical band 1 that is expanded to a diameter slightly below its yield point by expandable mandrel 2. Copper layer 3 is next applied to the outside diameter of band 1 and the circuit pattern is formed by etching. The exposed band 1 is next flash-coated with copper to facilitate later removal of band 1. An epoxy or suitable dielectric layer 4 is next applied over the flash coating.

In order to obtain adequate strength and thickness of the dielectric, a reinforcement winding can be applied to the inner circuit prior to coating with the dielectric. Layer 4 is machined to provide proper dimensions and layer 5 of copper is then applied. The outer circuit is formed by etching and the etched areas are filled with additional epoxy. The assembly is then machined flush with the outer circuitry.

The mandrel is removed allowing band 1 to contract to its original size. This permits removal of band 1 from the armature leaving the inner and outer circuits intact and embedded in supporting epoxy layer 3. The flash plating applied to the inner circuit to facilitate separation from band 1 is removed by a slight etch thus producing the finished armature.

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