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Obtaining Metal Thick Planes in Sintered Ceramics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091625D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chance, DA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The capillary fill technique is employed in forming thick metal planes within multilevel ceramic, microelectronic structures. In such structures for very dense, high speed circuitry applications, power distribution can be a significant problem. Thick, highly conductive planes become a necessity if interconnection problems, occasioned by the use of a multiplicity of thinner planes are to be avoided.

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Obtaining Metal Thick Planes in Sintered Ceramics

The capillary fill technique is employed in forming thick metal planes within multilevel ceramic, microelectronic structures. In such structures for very dense, high speed circuitry applications, power distribution can be a significant problem. Thick, highly conductive planes become a necessity if interconnection problems, occasioned by the use of a multiplicity of thinner planes are to be avoided.

In A, green sheets of ceramic 11, 12, 13 and of metal or metal oxides such as MoO(3), 3-10 mils thick, reference numeral 14, are formed from slurries of ceramic and MoO(3) particles, respectively, dispersed in an organic binder system. The slurries are cast to a desired thickness onto MYLAR* tapes, using doctor blading techniques. After drying, the sheets are stripped from the tape and cut to desired size. In the next step, via holes for interconnection of circuitry at different levels are formed.

As shown at B, a hole of desired via size is punched at 15 in ceramic sheet 11 and filled with MoO(3) paste 16. Then an oversized hole is formed at 17 within the MoO(3) sheet 14. A plug 18 of MoO(3) of the desired via hole size is formed within a washer-like region 19 of ceramic material inserted or previously screened into opening 17.

The sheets are stacked in registry, laminated and fired in an inert atmosphere. Upon sintering, the sheets fuse into a composite, as in C, with the molybdenum material wetting the ceramic and fo...