Browse Prior Art Database

Low Temperature Air Fired Multilevel Microelectronic Structure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091626D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schnitzel, RH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This technique permits the fabrication of a low-temperature, air-fired, multilevel, microelectronic structure employing a noble metal conductor system. As in A, ceramic material is cast and cut into green sheets, one of which is shown at 11, and punched at desired locations to form via holes 12 and sintered dense. In B, thin glass frit 13 is then deposited, as by screening, onto the surfaces of sheet 11, vacuum sucked into holes 12, and then fired sufficiently to bond frit 13 to sheet 11. The desired noble metallurgy, typically silver-palladium, is then deposited, as by silk screening, in the via holes 12, as shown at 14 in D, and in a desired pattern on the surfaces of the glass-coated sheets as at 15 in E.

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Low Temperature Air Fired Multilevel Microelectronic Structure

This technique permits the fabrication of a low-temperature, air-fired, multilevel, microelectronic structure employing a noble metal conductor system. As in A, ceramic material is cast and cut into green sheets, one of which is shown at 11, and punched at desired locations to form via holes 12 and sintered dense.

In B, thin glass frit 13 is then deposited, as by screening, onto the surfaces of sheet 11, vacuum sucked into holes 12, and then fired sufficiently to bond frit 13 to sheet 11. The desired noble metallurgy, typically silver-palladium, is then deposited, as by silk screening, in the via holes 12, as shown at 14 in D, and in a desired pattern on the surfaces of the glass-coated sheets as at 15 in E. Finally, the sheets are stacked in registry as in F and fused together, in air, essentially at the melting point of the glass frit, thus forming a monolithic, multilevel structure. The final structure is shown in G.

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