Browse Prior Art Database

Data Collection Terminal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091672D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rocca, CJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

The data collection terminal is made up of key-card reader 20 and tape recorder 22. Reader 20 reads out information from either a keyboard or a punched card. The information from reader 20 is passed to recorder 22 where it is recorded on magnetic tape stored in a tape cassette. At some later time, recorder 22 is required by a data processing system to read out the information on the tape.

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Data Collection Terminal

The data collection terminal is made up of key-card reader 20 and tape recorder 22. Reader 20 reads out information from either a keyboard or a punched card. The information from reader 20 is passed to recorder 22 where it is recorded on magnetic tape stored in a tape cassette. At some later time, recorder 22 is required by a data processing system to read out the information on the tape.

To initiate operation, the operator throws a mode switch on reader 20. One switch position indicates keyboard mode of operation. The other switch position indicates card read mode of operation. In either event, request access circuit 24 generates a request signal which is passed to sequence access control 26 in recorder 22.

The keyboard mode signal which triggers a request is from timeout circuit 19. And 17 is enabled by circuit 19 which is energized by a signal from Or 18. The latter receives the keyboard mode signal and also a signal from And 17. When the operator throws the keyboard mode switch, a pulse signal passes through Or 18 and initiates circuit 19. The latter provides a fifteen-second interval during which And 17 is enabled to pass a signal if the operator hits a key. If the operator does not hit a key within fifteen seconds, circuit 19 ceases to energize circuit 24. This prevents an operator from tieing up access to recorder 22 when not actually keying in information.

Sequence access control 26 in recorder 22 monitors request signals from other readers. If reader 20 can have access, control 26 generates two signals which are sent back to reader 20. In addition, control 26 turns on tape drive motor 27 when a request access signal is received. Of the two signals sent back to reader 20, the first signal enables And's 28 and 30. The second signal enables And 40. If reader 20 is in a card read mode, And 40 also receives a card mode signal and energizes drive circuits 38 for feeding the card to the card read station. The same card read mode signal is also passed by And 30 to energize card read brushes 32.

If the mode of operation is keyboard, then a no card signal out of Inverter 34 is passed by And 28 to energize keyboard 36. Signals from brushes 32 or keyboard 36, whichever is energized, are passed by Or 42 to translator 44 in recorder 22. Translator 44 receives 15 lines in parallel from reader 20. Ten of these lines are for the numerals 0...9. The remaining five lines are for key code signals. Translator 44 converts the one-of-fifteen parallel lines from reader 20 into a five bit word, four binary-coded decimal bits and a parity bit, and loads the five bits into shift register 46.

Meanwhile, the operation of recorder 22 is initiated by one of two signals from reader 20. One signal is any key depressed by keyboard 36. This signal is passed from the keyboard to Or 48. The alternative initiation signal is the 11 brush from brushes 32. If the 11 brush detects a punched hole in the 11 zone, it passes a signal to Or 48...