Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Braillewriter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091689D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Davidge, RV: AUTHOR

Abstract

Braille writing is generated automatically from a magnetic record in a System like that shown in U. S. patent 3,292,124, having added to it an electromagnet controlled typebar typewriter like that shown in U. S. patent 2,687,199 and arranged to generate embossed Braille cells through the use of type heads formed as shown in IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Volume 9, No. 11, page 1616.

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Automatic Braillewriter

Braille writing is generated automatically from a magnetic record in a System like that shown in U. S. patent 3,292,124, having added to it an electromagnet controlled typebar typewriter like that shown in U. S. patent 2,687,199 and arranged to generate embossed Braille cells through the use of type heads formed as shown in IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Volume 9, No. 11, page 1616.

Translation of English into Braille is accomplished through a relay tree decoder for operating individual typebars and operational controls of the output Braille typewriter or Braillewriter. Some portion of the translation is handled as direct character-for-character substitution. Other portions of the translation involve the use of prefix characters and other nonEnglish conventions to fully present correct readable Braille copies. Preferably, Braille output is accompanied by outputs on the printing typewriter to make the operator aware of the exact material being printed.

The mechanism is capable of three modes of Braille operation. First, in a Direct mode, all key strokes recorded on the magnetic record are simply reproduced on the Braillewriter and the operator is relied upon to provide translations and conventions. Second, in Grade 1 Literary Braille, the basic Braille conventions recognized in literary material are automatically executed. Third, in Mathematical Braille, basic Braille conventions are automatically executed and different Braille symbols of the Nemeth Mathematical Braille Code are automatically substituted.

There are several required conventions. The capital sign is inserted before a capital letter at the beginning of a word. The number sign is inserted before any number. Only one number sign is used with a multidigit number. A period within or following a number is replaced with the decimal sign. The letter sign is inserted before any lower-case letter a through j following a number without an intervening space. A prefix character is inserted when two Braille characters are required for a single print character.

Input relays 10 respond to coded data from tape 11 to operate translator 12. The latter determines which magnet 13 on the Braille-writer is to be pulsed. In addition to the outputs used to drive the magnets of the Braillewriter, the decode network has the following outputs. PRE means that the insertion of a Braille prefix character is required. CAP means that the prefix character is obtained in the upper case of the Braillewriter. CAR means that the replacement character, the single character represented by the tape code or the second character of a two-character sequence represented by the code,is obtained in the upper case of the Braillewriter. CAN means that the replacement character is an upper- or lower-case character. NO means that the tape code represents a number. RNS means that the effect of a previously supplied number sign is continued, that is, a new number sign is not required. DEL me...