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Repair Technology for Modules

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091714D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Spielmann, WK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Modules comprising a great number of chips are rendered useless if only one chip becomes defective so that the yield decreases as the number of chips per module increases. Therefore, it is expedient for such modules to be repaired by exchanging the defective chips. Methods to this end include oil baths or resistance-heated pliers. Such have the disadvantage that they can merely be employed for detaching but not for reapplying the chip. To eliminate this shortcoming, an adjustable or dimmable light source is used for heating the defective chip through a lens or mirror system until the chip can be removed. The image-reproducing system is focussed on the chip, the focus size being so regulatable that the chip to be treated is heated in its entirety without neighboring chips being affected.

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Repair Technology for Modules

Modules comprising a great number of chips are rendered useless if only one chip becomes defective so that the yield decreases as the number of chips per module increases. Therefore, it is expedient for such modules to be repaired by exchanging the defective chips. Methods to this end include oil baths or resistance-heated pliers. Such have the disadvantage that they can merely be employed for detaching but not for reapplying the chip. To eliminate this shortcoming, an adjustable or dimmable light source is used for heating the defective chip through a lens or mirror system until the chip can be removed. The image-reproducing system is focussed on the chip, the focus size being so regulatable that the chip to be treated is heated in its entirety without neighboring chips being affected. In the same manner, a new chip can be deposited on the module. The melting process, to be applied after the chips are adjusted, is nondestructive.

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