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Multiplex Switching Circuits

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091717D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kosanke, K: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In order to successively connect one and the same group of electrical components, e.g., transistors, resistors, diodes, etc., to form several circuits, a great number of lines is provided which are nonconductive when not activated. A circuit is obtained when some of these lines are activated by a signal, using one of two physical effects, namely, a change of conductivity of photoconductive material by exposure to light and a change of conductivity in a semiconductor through electron injection by an electronic beam.

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Multiplex Switching Circuits

In order to successively connect one and the same group of electrical components, e.g., transistors, resistors, diodes, etc., to form several circuits, a great number of lines is provided which are nonconductive when not activated. A circuit is obtained when some of these lines are activated by a signal, using one of two physical effects, namely, a change of conductivity of photoconductive material by exposure to light and a change of conductivity in a semiconductor through electron injection by an electronic beam.

The lines are represented by a pattern being applied to the semiconductor substrate by projection or with the aid of masks, using light or electronic beams. The circuit formed is dissolved when the light is turned off.

An alternative consists in narrow lines or portions of such lines being made of semiconductor materials which are rendered conductive through global lighting. In order to successively represent different circuits, selectively sensitive materials can be used in conjunction with monochromatic light so that a circuit is realized by exposure to heterochromatic light.

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