Browse Prior Art Database

Welder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091802D
Original Publication Date: 1968-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Donato, SG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The apparatus is for welding small electrical components. As an example, wire 2, coated with polyurethane insulation 3, is to be welded to conductive pad 4 on core memory frame 5. Pad 4 is made of a brazable material. The welder includes conventional U-shaped tip 6 that is connected to electrical supply 7 that heats tip 6 sufficiently to strip insulation 3 from wire 2 being welded. After insulation 3 is stripped, weld supply 8 provides a high current of short duration that flows between the wire 2 and pad 4. The current causes the pad material to momentarily melt and forms a brazed connection.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 98% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Welder

The apparatus is for welding small electrical components. As an example, wire 2, coated with polyurethane insulation 3, is to be welded to conductive pad 4 on core memory frame 5. Pad 4 is made of a brazable material. The welder includes conventional U-shaped tip 6 that is connected to electrical supply 7 that heats tip 6 sufficiently to strip insulation 3 from wire 2 being welded. After insulation 3 is stripped, weld supply 8 provides a high current of short duration that flows between the wire 2 and pad 4. The current causes the pad material to momentarily melt and forms a brazed connection.

One terminal of supply 8 is connected through diodes 9 and 10 to each side of tip 6. Diodes 9 and 10 isolate the two leads of supply 7 from the single lead of supply 8. The weld current can now use both sides of tip 6 producing a better current density at the weld area and thus a more uniform weld.

Zener diodes 11 and 12 are connected to suppress a weld blow. A blow occurs when the weld circuit is interrupted at the weld area and the voltage associated with the interruption produces an arc. This arc often destroys the wire and the pad being welded and damages the weld tip. When a blow occurs in this circuit, the voltage rises only to the level to turn on diodes 11 and 12. Arcing at tip 6 is suppressed. Diodes 11 and 12 are located as close as possible to the weld area to minimize the effect of the inductance of the weld circuit.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 2...