Browse Prior Art Database

Rapid Access of Variable Length Messages

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091836D
Original Publication Date: 1968-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Araldi, RJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The method is for arranging the segments of a large number of audio response messages over several storage tapes. The manner in which the message segments are arranged and retrieved permits a few seconds access to the beginning of any one of a number of messages ranging in duration from a few seconds to several minutes.

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Rapid Access of Variable Length Messages

The method is for arranging the segments of a large number of audio response messages over several storage tapes. The manner in which the message segments are arranged and retrieved permits a few seconds access to the beginning of any one of a number of messages ranging in duration from a few seconds to several minutes.

The audio messages are divided into segments with each segment of a single message stored on a different tape. The segments of a single message are divided so that they progressively increase in length with the first segment of each message being the shortest. The first segment of each of the first three messages is stored on tapes 1, 2, and 3, respectively, closest to the home position. The first segment of each of the next three messages is stored in the respective second position of tapes 1, 2, and 3 immediately to the left of the first segments of messages 1, 2, and 3. As indicated by the broken lines between segments 1 and segments 2, such an arrangement is continued until the first segments are all stored. The second and third segments are then systematically distributed over the first three tapes with no two segments of the same message appearing on the same tape. The last segment of each of the messages is placed on tapes 4A and 5A. The duplicates of tapes 4A and 5A make up tapes 4B and 5B not shown. In the same manner, messages are stored on the portions of tape to the right of the home position.

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