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Inducing Impurity Migration in Semiconductors by Lasers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091914D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Joshi, ML: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This method reduces surface damage of the semiconductor and promote the formation of uniform junctions in laser-induced diffusion operations. A problem in laser-induced diffusion techniques, when using either a continuous or pulsed laser beam directed at the surface having a coating including an impurity, is the resulting surface damage. This damage can be reduced by a number of techniques. The layer overlying the semiconductor can be used to provide protection. Providing a thicker layer, as for example, a doped pyrolytic oxide layer having a thickness on the order of 5000 to 15000 angstroms reduces the surface damage.

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Inducing Impurity Migration in Semiconductors by Lasers

This method reduces surface damage of the semiconductor and promote the formation of uniform junctions in laser-induced diffusion operations. A problem in laser-induced diffusion techniques, when using either a continuous or pulsed laser beam directed at the surface having a coating including an impurity, is the resulting surface damage. This damage can be reduced by a number of techniques. The layer overlying the semiconductor can be used to provide protection. Providing a thicker layer, as for example, a doped pyrolytic oxide layer having a thickness on the order of 5000 to 15000 angstroms reduces the surface damage.

The formation of extremely shallow N/+/ or P/+/ type junctions having a smooth junction front is imperative particularly in transistor structures. A method for forming such junctions is depositing, either thermally, anodically, or pyrolytically, a sufficiently thick oxide or nitride film, of a thickness between 500 to 10,000 angstroms, and painting the insulating surface with P(2)O(5) or B(2)O(3). Alternately, the oxide layer can be converted in an open tube diffusion furnace with the usual POCl(3), P(2)O(5), PH(2) or B(2)O(3) in SiO(2) - P(2)O(5) or SiO(2) - B(2)O(3) type glasses. The layer can be covered with liquid or solid Ga or powders of In, Sb, As, Al or P. Thin metallic films of the suitable elements can be also used as the layers, When the intensity of the laser beam can be sufficient...