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Formation and Control of Stable P Type Surfaces on Semiconductors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000091927D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aboaf, JA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The deposition of aluminum oxide on the surface of a semiconductor, such as germanium or silicon, induces a P-type surface at the oxide-semiconductor interface. The surface is produced by depositing aluminum oxide on the surface of a semiconductor or on the surface of a silicon dioxide coated surface by the pyrolytic decomposition of aluminum isopropoxide in a nonoxidizing atmosphere. Deposition of aluminum oxide films on a semiconductor substrate is accomplished by bubbling dry nitrogen gas through an aluminum isopropoxide source at constant temperature. Vapors of the organic aluminum compound are mixed with nitrogen or forming gas and transported no a heated semiconductor substrate where they pyrolyze to form aluminum oxide.

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Formation and Control of Stable P Type Surfaces on Semiconductors

The deposition of aluminum oxide on the surface of a semiconductor, such as germanium or silicon, induces a P-type surface at the oxide-semiconductor interface. The surface is produced by depositing aluminum oxide on the surface of a semiconductor or on the surface of a silicon dioxide coated surface by the pyrolytic decomposition of aluminum isopropoxide in a nonoxidizing atmosphere. Deposition of aluminum oxide films on a semiconductor substrate is accomplished by bubbling dry nitrogen gas through an aluminum isopropoxide source at constant temperature. Vapors of the organic aluminum compound are mixed with nitrogen or forming gas and transported no a heated semiconductor substrate where they pyrolyze to form aluminum oxide. The substrate is normally heated at a temperature of approximately 300 degrees C, but in this technique the substrate is heated anywhere in the range of 380 degrees C to 700 degrees
C. Deposition of aluminum oxide in the temperature range cited, shows enhanced stability. Physical and chemical properties such as etch rate, hardness, dissipation factor and resistance to moisture absorption are enhanced. Deposition in the described temperature range results in the formation of highly stable P-type surfaces on semiconductors.

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