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Protecting Semiconductor Wafer Surfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000092051D
Original Publication Date: 1968-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hebard, RR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method protects semiconductor surfaces during the interim between polishing and the growing of an epitaxial layer. The protection of polished semiconductor surfaces is important in the prevention of surface damage, contamination, and handling damage experienced by polished wafers prior to epitaxial growth. Wafers, after polishing, are subjected to a considerable handling prior to growth of an epitaxial layer. This handling increases the probability of contamination.

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Protecting Semiconductor Wafer Surfaces

This method protects semiconductor surfaces during the interim between polishing and the growing of an epitaxial layer. The protection of polished semiconductor surfaces is important in the prevention of surface damage, contamination, and handling damage experienced by polished wafers prior to epitaxial growth. Wafers, after polishing, are subjected to a considerable handling prior to growth of an epitaxial layer. This handling increases the probability of contamination.

The method consists of deliberately growing a thin film of SiO(2) on a freshly polished silicon wafer. The film is on the order of 700 to 800 angstroms in thickness and is applied by reducing silicon tetrachloride in the presence of water to form silicon dioxide and hydrogen chloride at room temperature. An alternate method is to react silane with oxygen or ozone to form SiO(2). The wafers can then be handled and stored. When the epitaxial layer is to be applied to the surface of the wafer, the thin film of SiO(2) can be reduced in a hydrogen atmosphere prior to formation of the layer. Alternatively, the SiO(2) can be removed with hydrofluoric acid prior to the first oxidation.

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